Thursday, July 14, 2011

VOGUE -THE "MEN'S" ISSUE 1953



i want a girl in a short skirt and a long jacket


Vogue May 1953
The Men's Issue


The 1953 Man in Vogue


Blazers and White Flannels Back in The Country


The Man In Slacks

Fashion and the woman who dresses for a man
Harvey Berin
Erwin Blumenfeld

As for women's clothes, and men's feelings about them: fashions herein, too, for the women who dresses for a man - guaranteed to succeed with all but the man who doesn't notice any style of women's dressing unless it's a good salad dressing. Conclusion: please tell each other when you're pleased with each other?

The New Black
and the woman who dresses for a man
Rembrandt
Erwin Blumenfeld


The New Black
and the woman who dresses for a man
Hannah Troy
Erwin Blumenfeld



The New Slenderness
and the woman who dresses for a man
Lisa Fonssagrives in Traina-Norell
Irving Penn



The Floating Print
and the woman who dresses for a man
Count Sarmi of Elizabeth Arden
Horst P. Horst



The Floating Print
and the woman who dresses for a man
Junior Formals
Horst P. Horst


The Woman Who Dresses for Coolness
Sybil Connelly
Frances Mclaughlin


Dressing for the Paris Season
Dior
Henry Clarke


On Their Way Over: 1 Case Apiece
Paul Parnes - Timely
Milton Greene


Men On Their Way Up
Hart Schaffner & Marx - Talmack
Milton Greene


Men On Their Way Up
Haspel
John Rawlings


Man-Tamer
Marlene Dietrich, as The Ringmaster
Miss Dietrich, the eternally alluring, the woman of glamour, dares alternately to tear down the public's glamourous notions and then to rebuild them. She showed herself in a movie washing her teeth, arrived in the front lines during the war in slacks and a shirt, and changed to a beaded sheath when she sang. She wheeled her grandchildren to the park, and then recently at a benefit performance of the circus at Madison Square Garden startled the audience when she walked out (for only one night) as The Ringmaster. In this costume, which she artfully designed, she appeared in the dark immensity, with only a massive spotlight picking up the red of her coat, the diamond studs, the shining boots, the silk hat tipped to the side. Taking the microphone, she said to the entranced audience in a dark, warm, cavernous voice, "Hel-looo," adding affectionately, "Are you having any fun?" While Dynamite, "the only horse in the world able to gallop backwards," galloped backwards, some thirty photographers concentrated entirely on the lure of Miss Dietrich.

Vogue
May 1953


Marlene Dietrich
1901-1992
Once a Great Beauty



No comments: